Congestive Heart Failure: Bring on the Leeches?

Wikimedia photo.

The April edition of Right on Prime covers everything you need to know about congestive heart failure from the definition to palliative care, including advice on therapeutic phlebotomy. No matter where you practice you will find breath-taking take home points. Take a listen or read: The Generalist: Acute and End Stage CHF in the ED by Vanessa Cardy MD, Mel Herbert MD, and Heidi James MD in the April edition of Right on Prime available to all CMES participants using either the CMES thumb drive or Pi.

Leech application tubes and blood letting tool, probably from 1800s. Photo from Wikimedia.

Who Knew? Bloodletting (or blood-letting) is the withdrawal of blood from a patient to prevent or cure illness and disease. Bloodletting, now called therapeutic phlebotomy, whether by a physician or by leeches, was based on an ancient system of medicine in which blood and other bodily fluids were regarded as “humours” that had to remain in proper balance to maintain health. It is claimed to have been the most common medical practice performed by surgeons from antiquity until the late 19th century, a span of almost 2,000 years. (article content from Wikipedia)

C3: Psychiatric Emergencies Part 2

Wikimedia image.

Last week I introduced you to C3, Continuous Core Content, the newest medical education available to all CMES and CMES-Pi participants. The March C3 content is part two of psychiatric emergencies covering depression, anxiety and eating disorders. You can access the C3 folder with the thumb drive or the smartphone apps using the CMES-Pi.

Do you know what endocrine disorder can mimic depression or that pulmonary emboli can present with a common and misleading psychiatric complaint? A quick read of the Take Home Points will lift your spirits and lessen your anxiety when faced with a psychiatric emergency.

Who Knew? Psychiatric illness were recognized over 4000 years ago In the second millennium B.C. in Mesopotamia where there are written accounts of depression. It was thought to be a spiritual condition and therefor treated by priests instead of healers.

Introducing C3: Continuous Core Content

Photo from Wikimedia.

WooHoo…C3 is here for your listening and viewing pleasure! EM:RAP has generously provided Techies Without Borders their C3 content to add to our cloud based server. This CME content is available to participants using either the thumb drive (USB) or Raspberry-Pi access options. It will be in a separate folder and you can use the Search for specific topics.

C3 is a clinical based review on how to assess and treat common and grave Emergency Department and Urgent Care complaints. It’s ideal for all practitioners wanting to review the basics efficiently and quickly. Think of it as your basic Lego set.

The same great MP3 and PDF formats are available. The audio file contains a focused summary at the end of the talk, so if you are short on time you can fast forward. The PDF files start off with the all important Take Home Points for a quick update. You can also test your knowledge with the uploaded questions and answers.

Build up or reinforce your basic knowledge with C3. Thank you EM:RAP.

Who Knew? “The Lego Group began in the workshop of Ole Kirk Christiansen (1891–1958), a carpenter from Billund, Denmark, who began making wooden toys in 1932.[7][8] In 1934, his company came to be called “Lego” derived from the Danish phrase leg godt [lɑjˀ ˈɡʌd], which means “play well”.” (Wikipedia)

 

 

Sepsis and Pregnancy

Pregnant graffiti in Lebanon (Wikimedia)

According to an excerpt from Randi Hutter Epstein’s book Get Me Out: A History of Childbirth From the Garden of Eden to the Sperm Bank, five hundred years ago a folk healer advised Catherine de Medici, then the queen of France, to drink mare’s urine and bathe in cow manure to increase her chances of getting pregnant. And she did it. Fortunately, you won’t need mare’s urine to treat pregnant patients with sepsis. But you will need to listen to the March EM:RAP podcast or read the PDF called Sepsis and Infections in Pregnancy by Stewart Swadron MD, Gillian Schmitz MD, Rachel Bridwell MD and Brandon Carius PA.

What are the most common infections seen in pregnancy in your region? Are vital signs good indicators during maternal and fetal resuscitation? If you don’t have much time there are five quick Take Home Points for a 30-second read.

Wikimedia photo.

Who Knew? Some of the earliest women’s health books were written by monks…although they would not be my first or even seventh guess as authors. One of the most popular monk guides, Women’s Secrets, or De Secretis Mulierum, has been translated from the original text into modern language by Helen Rodnite Lemay, a medieval scholar.

Giving Tuesday

Napo River, Tena, Ecuador. Local means of travel for many doctors and nurses in the Amazon.

Tomorrow is Giving Tuesday…the kickoff to end-of-year and charitable giving.

Please consider making a donation to Techies Without Borders (TWB). Our current project, Continuing Medical Education on Stick (CMES), provides free continuing medical education to doctors and nurses in resource-challenged countries globally. You can donate here or here by clicking the green Donate button.
If you have previously donated this year consider sharing this information via social media and spreading the word.
With gratitude,
TWB Team

Meet Dr. Cristian Carreon, Santo Domingo, Ecuador

Dr. Cristian gives a thumbs up while using the CMES-Pi app to search for medical topics of interest.

Dr. Cristian is a full-time Family Practice doctor at the Centro de Salud Hombro a Hombro Clinic (CSHH) in Santo Domingo, Ecuador. CSHH was established in 2007 and partners with Timmy Global Health during brigades. The clinic has three medical exam rooms, dental room and services, an office and a pharmacy. This small but mighty clinic, staffed by two nurses, one part-time and Dr. Cristian, serves approximately 20,000 patients from the poor urban neighborhoods each year.

Centro de Salud Hombro a Hombro Clinic (CSHH) in Santo Domingo, Ecuador.

Dr. Cristian and his staff have few opportunities or financial resources to attend continuing medical education (CME) conferences in Santo Domingo or Quito. A CMES Raspberry-Pi device was installed in the clinic and using smartphone apps the doctors and nurses can access free CME at the clinic. Every month about 20 new topics are available in Spanish as PDF files.

Dataplicity

Dr. Manoj Thomas and Dataplicity Founder, Elliot Mackenzie, London, England May 2018.

Techies Without Borders (TWB) partners with Dataplicity. Dataplicity is the foundation for IoT remote support and provides TWB with a generous allowance to keep track of our Raspberry-Pi data.

IoT = Internet of Things…sounds like a scifi book but means using the “Internet” as the backbone of connectivity and the “Things” are your devices. Your things collect data and send it to the Internet. Put it all together and IoT converts a normal device into a smart device. TWB installs Dataplicty on CMES-Pis before it gets to the clinics and hospitals. With Dataplicity, we are able to manage and update CMES-Pi devices located in remote and hard to reach areas. This means we can monitor and fix any issues without long distance phone calls and walking non-technology users through diagnostics.

Who Knew: Data geeks knew…there are a lot of data jokes on the web…one of my favorite.