Somewhere Over the Rainbow

Dorothy’s original ruby slippers (Wikicommons)

Neonatal stools are a source of concern for parents and color changes can trigger a visit to the emergency department or outpatient clinic. What colors raise your index of concern for serious pathologies such as necrotizing enterocolitis, malrotation with midgut volvulus or intussusception? Plug in your thumb drive or roll out your CMES app and take a listen to Jess Mason MD and Jason Woods MD as they discuss the EM:RAP podcast called Neonatal Stool Rainbow. You won’t find the Wizard of Oz but you’ll take home some knowledge…even without your ruby slippers.

 

 

Hyperbilirubinemia: Mellow Yellow Isn’t Just a 1960’s Song

Phototherapy for neonatal jaundice. (photo courtesy Wikicommons)

Hyperbilirubinemia: one of the most common problems seen in term newborns and warrants a periodic review to refresh our knowledge base. Consider this case: A well-appearing infant presents and is jaundiced. The baby has a cephalohematoma and is breast feeding. Everything else is fine. The child is eating well and urinating. Do you still need to send labs?

Take a listen to the MP3 podcast or read the PDF in the January EMRAP podcast: Hyperbilirubinemia by Rob Orman MD and Tim Horeczko MD.

 

Who Knew? Jaundice was observed for centuries but the earliest medical literature was by Jean Baptiste Thimotee Baumes (Baumes, J. 1806). This description was published as a chapter in a book entitled: Traite de L’amaigrissemwnt des enfans. Christian Schmorl in Dresden was the first to coin the term “Kernicterus” in 1904.