What’s the Buzz About Honey?

Manuka honey (Wikipedia)

The May edition of Emergency Medical Reviews and Perspectives (EM:RAP), your CME sponsor for the Continuing Medical Education on Stick (CMES) Project, has an article on the use of honey in the emergency department or outpatient clinic. The commonly known medical uses for honey include cough suppression and skin wound antibacterial agent. Other uses that can be life saving are cited in the article titled, Honey for Everything by Ilene Claudius MD and Sol Behar MD. Buzz on over to your thumb drive or CMES-Pi and take a listen or read. It’ll sweeten your day.

 

Five-petaled white flowers and round buds on twigs bearing short spiky leaves. A dark bee is in the centre of one of the flowers.

Manuka bloom (Wikipedia)

Who Knew? The antibacterial effects of honey vary widely depending on the type and production location as cited by Willix et al. of the University of Waikato in New Zealand. Manuka honey found in New Zealand is reported to have high antibacterial activity.

 

Time to Charge Your Battery…

With a jolt of information on button battery ingestions by pediatrician Ilene Claudius. The November 2017 EM:RAP edition has a podcast sure to shock you. From one end of the tail to the other, your patient outcomes can range from benign ingestion and passage over a few days to death.

A variety of button batteries found in toys. (Photo from Wikimedia Commons.)

The leakage of alkaline materials will cause liquefaction necrosis rapidly. (Photo from Wikimedia Commons.)

Button battery or coin? Read the EMRAP PDF or listen to the podcast to learn how to differentiate. (Photo from http://www.radiologypics.com)

 

The National Capital Poison Center posted the NBIH Button Battery Ingestion Triage and Treatment Guideline: https://www.poison.org/battery/guideline

Battery ingestions are no laughing matter but I can’t end without one bad joke: What did the depleted battery say to the judge? “Feel free to charge me.”