What’s the Buzz About Honey?

Manuka honey (Wikipedia)

The May edition of Emergency Medical Reviews and Perspectives (EM:RAP), your CME sponsor for the Continuing Medical Education on Stick (CMES) Project, has an article on the use of honey in the emergency department or outpatient clinic. The commonly known medical uses for honey include cough suppression and skin wound antibacterial agent. Other uses that can be life saving are cited in the article titled, Honey for Everything by Ilene Claudius MD and Sol Behar MD. Buzz on over to your thumb drive or CMES-Pi and take a listen or read. It’ll sweeten your day.

 

Five-petaled white flowers and round buds on twigs bearing short spiky leaves. A dark bee is in the centre of one of the flowers.

Manuka bloom (Wikipedia)

Who Knew? The antibacterial effects of honey vary widely depending on the type and production location as cited by Willix et al. of the University of Waikato in New Zealand. Manuka honey found in New Zealand is reported to have high antibacterial activity.

 

CMES-Pi Participant Highlight: Mount St. John’s Medical Center, Antigua

Meet Dr. Vonetta George who works at Mount St. John’s Medical Center (MSJMC) in Antigua. Dr. Vonetta works in all critical care areas of the hospital including supervising the 15 doctors and 2 dozen+ nurses in the Emergency Department.

Antigua is located in the West Indies, a Leeward Island in the Caribbean. Mount St. John’s serves the population of Antigua and also Barbuda. Working on an isolated island directly affects the doctors and nurses ability to access current continuing medical education in a cost effective manner. Dr. Vonetta was the gail force hurricane behind getting the CMES-Pi Project installed in her hospital. MSJMC installed a CMES-Pi in June last year. Using our smart phone apps the staff can look up CME current practice topics at bedside. The CME is provided by our partner Emergency Medicine Reviews and Perspectives. The PDF files provide helpful bullet points and take seconds to read. The MP3 files are providing topics for weekly group CME conferences and discussions. The CMES-Pi Project directly impacts access to CME for 101 doctors and 179 nurses at the hospital. Thank you Dr. Vonetta!

Who Knew? The first inhabitants were the Siboney, who can be dated back to 2400 BCE. Arawaks settled subsequently, around the 1st century CE. The Caribs arrived later, but abandoned Antigua around the 16th century, due to the shortage of fresh water. Christopher Columbus sighted the larger island in 1493, and named it after a church in Seville, Santa Maria de la Antigua. (Commonwealth)

Thumbs Up for Victoria Hospital, Castries, St. Lucia

Victoria Hospital, Castries, St. Lucia

Dr. Lisa Charles, ED Director

Welcome and meet Dr. Lisa Charles, Director of Victoria Hospital Emergency Department. Dr. Charles and her team of eight ED physicians joined the Continuing Medical Education on Stick (CMES) project this month. CMES is a collaborative initiative to improve access to cme for medical practitioners in resource-challenged areas.

Victoria Hospital is located in Castries, St. Lucia, an island in the eastern Caribbean Sea. It is the main public healthcare facility for the northern part of the island. Mr. C. Felix St. Hill, Permanent Secretary of the Department of Health and Wellness granted permission for Dr. Debra Stoner, from Techies Without Borders (TWB), to present the project to the ED staff and train them how to use the CMES thumb drives. CMES is an education project of TWB.

Dr. Charles plans to use the lectures to meet some of the St. Lucia Medical Council’s cme requirements as traveling off the island to attend cme conferences can be challenging for her staff.

Who knew? Maybe you know of colleagues in challenging clinical practices who would benefit from the CMES Project? Please put them in contact with Dr. Debra Stoner: debra@himanchal.org

 

 

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