Flip the Social Media Switch

Glenda, Community Health nurse, Tena, Ecuador.

Social media metrics provides support when applying for grants and shows our partners and donors that the CME Project is successful. Help us flip the switch for equal continuing medical education opportunity globally for all health providers.

Techies Without Borders is on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram. Connect and share to support our CMES Project which provides free continuing medical education to doctors and nurses in developing countries.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techieswob/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/34219833/admin/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/TechiesWB

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/techieswithoutborders/

More Slices of Pi for the Oceania Region

Dr. Manoj Thomas, TWB Co-founder and President, works at the University of Sydney Business School. He is in the perfect location to expand CMES and CMES-Pi in the Oceania Region this fall.
Presently the CMES Project is in Fiji, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Somoa, Tonga and Cook Islands. The doctors and nurses are sharing a limited number of thumb drives. More doctors and nurses working in these remote islands will receive thumb drives and the major hospitals will have CMES-Pi installed.

What’s the Buzz About Honey?

Manuka honey (Wikipedia)

The May edition of Emergency Medical Reviews and Perspectives (EM:RAP), your CME sponsor for the Continuing Medical Education on Stick (CMES) Project, has an article on the use of honey in the emergency department or outpatient clinic. The commonly known medical uses for honey include cough suppression and skin wound antibacterial agent. Other uses that can be life saving are cited in the article titled, Honey for Everything by Ilene Claudius MD and Sol Behar MD. Buzz on over to your thumb drive or CMES-Pi and take a listen or read. It’ll sweeten your day.

 

Five-petaled white flowers and round buds on twigs bearing short spiky leaves. A dark bee is in the centre of one of the flowers.

Manuka bloom (Wikipedia)

Who Knew? The antibacterial effects of honey vary widely depending on the type and production location as cited by Willix et al. of the University of Waikato in New Zealand. Manuka honey found in New Zealand is reported to have high antibacterial activity.

 

CMES-Pi Participant Highlight: Mount St. John’s Medical Center, Antigua

Meet Dr. Vonetta George who works at Mount St. John’s Medical Center (MSJMC) in Antigua. Dr. Vonetta works in all critical care areas of the hospital including supervising the 15 doctors and 2 dozen+ nurses in the Emergency Department.

Antigua is located in the West Indies, a Leeward Island in the Caribbean. Mount St. John’s serves the population of Antigua and also Barbuda. Working on an isolated island directly affects the doctors and nurses ability to access current continuing medical education in a cost effective manner. Dr. Vonetta was the gail force hurricane behind getting the CMES-Pi Project installed in her hospital. MSJMC installed a CMES-Pi in June last year. Using our smart phone apps the staff can look up CME current practice topics at bedside. The CME is provided by our partner Emergency Medicine Reviews and Perspectives. The PDF files provide helpful bullet points and take seconds to read. The MP3 files are providing topics for weekly group CME conferences and discussions. The CMES-Pi Project directly impacts access to CME for 101 doctors and 179 nurses at the hospital. Thank you Dr. Vonetta!

Who Knew? The first inhabitants were the Siboney, who can be dated back to 2400 BCE. Arawaks settled subsequently, around the 1st century CE. The Caribs arrived later, but abandoned Antigua around the 16th century, due to the shortage of fresh water. Christopher Columbus sighted the larger island in 1493, and named it after a church in Seville, Santa Maria de la Antigua. (Commonwealth)

Congestive Heart Failure: Bring on the Leeches?

Wikimedia photo.

The April edition of Right on Prime covers everything you need to know about congestive heart failure from the definition to palliative care, including advice on therapeutic phlebotomy. No matter where you practice you will find breath-taking take home points. Take a listen or read: The Generalist: Acute and End Stage CHF in the ED by Vanessa Cardy MD, Mel Herbert MD, and Heidi James MD in the April edition of Right on Prime available to all CMES participants using either the CMES thumb drive or Pi.

Leech application tubes and blood letting tool, probably from 1800s. Photo from Wikimedia.

Who Knew? Bloodletting (or blood-letting) is the withdrawal of blood from a patient to prevent or cure illness and disease. Bloodletting, now called therapeutic phlebotomy, whether by a physician or by leeches, was based on an ancient system of medicine in which blood and other bodily fluids were regarded as “humours” that had to remain in proper balance to maintain health. It is claimed to have been the most common medical practice performed by surgeons from antiquity until the late 19th century, a span of almost 2,000 years. (article content from Wikipedia)

C3: Psychiatric Emergencies Part 2

Wikimedia image.

Last week I introduced you to C3, Continuous Core Content, the newest medical education available to all CMES and CMES-Pi participants. The March C3 content is part two of psychiatric emergencies covering depression, anxiety and eating disorders. You can access the C3 folder with the thumb drive or the smartphone apps using the CMES-Pi.

Do you know what endocrine disorder can mimic depression or that pulmonary emboli can present with a common and misleading psychiatric complaint? A quick read of the Take Home Points will lift your spirits and lessen your anxiety when faced with a psychiatric emergency.

Who Knew? Psychiatric illness were recognized over 4000 years ago In the second millennium B.C. in Mesopotamia where there are written accounts of depression. It was thought to be a spiritual condition and therefor treated by priests instead of healers.

Introducing C3: Continuous Core Content

Photo from Wikimedia.

WooHoo…C3 is here for your listening and viewing pleasure! EM:RAP has generously provided Techies Without Borders their C3 content to add to our cloud based server. This CME content is available to participants using either the thumb drive (USB) or Raspberry-Pi access options. It will be in a separate folder and you can use the Search for specific topics.

C3 is a clinical based review on how to assess and treat common and grave Emergency Department and Urgent Care complaints. It’s ideal for all practitioners wanting to review the basics efficiently and quickly. Think of it as your basic Lego set.

The same great MP3 and PDF formats are available. The audio file contains a focused summary at the end of the talk, so if you are short on time you can fast forward. The PDF files start off with the all important Take Home Points for a quick update. You can also test your knowledge with the uploaded questions and answers.

Build up or reinforce your basic knowledge with C3. Thank you EM:RAP.

Who Knew? “The Lego Group began in the workshop of Ole Kirk Christiansen (1891–1958), a carpenter from Billund, Denmark, who began making wooden toys in 1932.[7][8] In 1934, his company came to be called “Lego” derived from the Danish phrase leg godt [lɑjˀ ˈɡʌd], which means “play well”.” (Wikipedia)

 

 

Aneurysms: It’ll Blow Your Mind

Abdominal aorta MRI. (Wikimedia)

Practicing in rural and remote regions globally with limited staff and resources poses challenges not faced by your colleagues in larger cities and academic centers. Case presentations from those working in rural regions help us understand the restrictions, challenges, and downright genius solutions from treating to to saving a life. I find these stories uplifting, invigorating, and deserving of a standing ovation.

Take a listen or read about The Case of the Man with the Aneurysm by Vanessa Cardy MD and Mel Herbert MD in the EM:RAP April files. It’ll expand your knowledge.

 

Who Knew?

On 17 April 1955, Einstein experienced a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, which had previously been reinforced surgically by a surgeon in 1948. He took the draft of a speech he was preparing for a television appearance commemorating the State of Israel’s seventh anniversary with him to the hospital, but he did not live long enough to complete it. Einstein refused surgery, saying, “I want to go when I want. It is tasteless to prolong life artificially. I have done my share; it is time to go. I will do it elegantly.” He died early the next morning at the age of 76, having continued to work until near the end. (Wikipedia)

 

DevelopingEM: A Model for Emergency Medicine Collaboration

Dr.Mereoni Voce from Labasa Hospital at the DevelopingEM Conference in Fiji.

DevelopingEM is a partner of Techies Without Borders. DevelopingEM is a nonprofit corporation from Australia with a model to promote and develop Emergency Medicine globally through collaboration. Last December Dr. Deb was invited to speak at their sixth conference in Fiji. Each conference is designed to deliver excellent emergency medicine and critical care content. Not only is the conference for practicing EM specialists but the model brings local health providers to the conference supported by the conference fees and contributions. They encourage global collaboration between countries where EM is developing and gaining momentum as a specialty.

DevelopingEM is heading to Cartagena, Colombia for their seventh Emergency Medicine and Critical Care conference. Consider joining them in March 2020 for a chance to support this forward-thinking team.

Sepsis and Pregnancy

Pregnant graffiti in Lebanon (Wikimedia)

According to an excerpt from Randi Hutter Epstein’s book Get Me Out: A History of Childbirth From the Garden of Eden to the Sperm Bank, five hundred years ago a folk healer advised Catherine de Medici, then the queen of France, to drink mare’s urine and bathe in cow manure to increase her chances of getting pregnant. And she did it. Fortunately, you won’t need mare’s urine to treat pregnant patients with sepsis. But you will need to listen to the March EM:RAP podcast or read the PDF called Sepsis and Infections in Pregnancy by Stewart Swadron MD, Gillian Schmitz MD, Rachel Bridwell MD and Brandon Carius PA.

What are the most common infections seen in pregnancy in your region? Are vital signs good indicators during maternal and fetal resuscitation? If you don’t have much time there are five quick Take Home Points for a 30-second read.

Wikimedia photo.

Who Knew? Some of the earliest women’s health books were written by monks…although they would not be my first or even seventh guess as authors. One of the most popular monk guides, Women’s Secrets, or De Secretis Mulierum, has been translated from the original text into modern language by Helen Rodnite Lemay, a medieval scholar.

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