Sepsis and Pregnancy

Pregnant graffiti in Lebanon (Wikimedia)

According to an excerpt from Randi Hutter Epstein’s book Get Me Out: A History of Childbirth From the Garden of Eden to the Sperm Bank, five hundred years ago a folk healer advised Catherine de Medici, then the queen of France, to drink mare’s urine and bathe in cow manure to increase her chances of getting pregnant. And she did it. Fortunately, you won’t need mare’s urine to treat pregnant patients with sepsis. But you will need to listen to the March EM:RAP podcast or read the PDF called Sepsis and Infections in Pregnancy by Stewart Swadron MD, Gillian Schmitz MD, Rachel Bridwell MD and Brandon Carius PA.

What are the most common infections seen in pregnancy in your region? Are vital signs good indicators during maternal and fetal resuscitation? If you don’t have much time there are five quick Take Home Points for a 30-second read.

Wikimedia photo.

Who Knew? Some of the earliest women’s health books were written by monks…although they would not be my first or even seventh guess as authors. One of the most popular monk guides, Women’s Secrets, or De Secretis Mulierum, has been translated from the original text into modern language by Helen Rodnite Lemay, a medieval scholar.