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    Giant Cell Arteritis

    I’m looking at cases to post and found one that could be me…because I’m over 60. Here’s the lowdown: over 60 years old with sudden vision loss? over 60 years

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    Rural Medicine: Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Once a month I will comment on the Rural Medicine podcast from EM:RAP. It’s exciting to read CME that can be applied globally no matter where you live or what

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  • Testicular Torsion – A Convoluted Case

    The 14-year-old male patient complained of right lower quadrant pain which varied in intensity for 1 day. He denied nausea, vomiting or fever. The abdominal exam revealed bowel sounds and

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  • Thumbs Up Nigeria

    Meet Dr. Dare Ogunlusi from Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria. He is an attending in the Department of Accident and Emergency. He is the newest recipient and participant in

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  • Time to Charge Your Battery…

    With a jolt of information on button battery ingestions by pediatrician Ilene Claudius. The November 2017 EM:RAP edition has a podcast sure to shock you. From one end of the

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CMES Thumbs Up for Dr. Aloima Taufilo

Dr. Aloima is an Emergency Department Registrar at the Princess Margaret Hospital in Tuvalu. It is the only hospital in the country, and the primary provider of medical services for all the islands of Tuvalu.

She was a delegate at the DevelopingEM Conference held in Fiji in early December. As a regional delegate she networked with similar doctors struggling to introduce Emergency Medicine concepts and management into their Oceania countries.

Dr. Aloima trained on the CMES thumb drive and will share it’s content with her colleagues at the Princess Margaret Hospital. TWB plans to install a CMES-Pi at the hospital in 2019.

Who Knew? The food culture of Tuvalu is based on the coconut and the many species of fish found in the ocean and lagoons of the atolls. Desserts are made from coconut milk instead of animal milk. The traditional foods eaten in Tuvalu are pulaka, taro, bananas, and breadfruit. Food taken from the sea includes coconut crabs, fish and seabirds.

 

How to Kill a Patient During Airway Management

Airway Management is just that…managing the airway upside down and inside out. Take a quick read of the PDF or listen to EM:RAP’s November MP3 audio podcast called Strayerisms: Fluid Filled Airway. It’ll float your boat.

Correct ET tube placement, but if you tube the esophagus, leave the ET tube in place and use it as a landmark.

According to Dr. Reuben Strayer MD, the author, there are four ways to harm your patient during airway management: failure to oxygenate; failure to ventilate; worsening perfusion; and aspiration. His suggestions are doable no matter where you practice or what resources you lack…remember…your greatest resource is knowledge.

 

 

 

Who Knew? Probably the oldest recovered boat in the world, the Pesse canoe, found in the Netherlands, is a dugout made from the hollowed tree trunk of a Pinus sylvestris that was constructed somewhere between 8200 and 7600 BC. This canoe is exhibited in the Drents Museum in Assen, Netherlands. (Not looking too seaworthy these days.)

 

 

Giving Tuesday

Napo River, Tena, Ecuador. Local means of travel for many doctors and nurses in the Amazon.

Tomorrow is Giving Tuesday…the kickoff to end-of-year and charitable giving.

Please consider making a donation to Techies Without Borders (TWB). Our current project, Continuing Medical Education on Stick (CMES), provides free continuing medical education to doctors and nurses in resource-challenged countries globally. You can donate here or here by clicking the green Donate button.
If you have previously donated this year consider sharing this information via social media and spreading the word.
With gratitude,
TWB Team

Meet Dr. Cristian Carreon, Santo Domingo, Ecuador

Dr. Cristian gives a thumbs up while using the CMES-Pi app to search for medical topics of interest.

Dr. Cristian is a full-time Family Practice doctor at the Centro de Salud Hombro a Hombro Clinic (CSHH) in Santo Domingo, Ecuador. CSHH was established in 2007 and partners with Timmy Global Health during brigades. The clinic has three medical exam rooms, dental room and services, an office and a pharmacy. This small but mighty clinic, staffed by two nurses, one part-time and Dr. Cristian, serves approximately 20,000 patients from the poor urban neighborhoods each year.

Centro de Salud Hombro a Hombro Clinic (CSHH) in Santo Domingo, Ecuador.

Dr. Cristian and his staff have few opportunities or financial resources to attend continuing medical education (CME) conferences in Santo Domingo or Quito. A CMES Raspberry-Pi device was installed in the clinic and using smartphone apps the doctors and nurses can access free CME at the clinic. Every month about 20 new topics are available in Spanish as PDF files.

Ecuador Gets a Slice of CMES-Pi

Dr. Debra Stoner departs this week to install CMES-Pi at two sites and dispense CMES thumb drives at two other sites in Ecuador, including Quito, Santo Domingo, Guangaje, and Tena.

The CMES thumb drives and CMES-Pi give rural doctors and nurses access to cutting-edge continuing medical education (CME). Timmy Global Health, a Techies Without Borders (TWB) partner, works alongside local health providers in Ecuador to provide healthcare in remote regions. The CME is provided free of charge by another TWB partner, Emergency Medicine Reviews and Perspectives (EM:RAP).

Visit TWB Twitter, Instagram and Facebook pages for more photos later this week.

Dataplicity

Dr. Manoj Thomas and Dataplicity Founder, Elliot Mackenzie, London, England May 2018.

Techies Without Borders (TWB) partners with Dataplicity. Dataplicity is the foundation for IoT remote support and provides TWB with a generous allowance to keep track of our Raspberry-Pi data.

IoT = Internet of Things…sounds like a scifi book but means using the “Internet” as the backbone of connectivity and the “Things” are your devices. Your things collect data and send it to the Internet. Put it all together and IoT converts a normal device into a smart device. TWB installs Dataplicty on CMES-Pis before it gets to the clinics and hospitals. With Dataplicity, we are able to manage and update CMES-Pi devices located in remote and hard to reach areas. This means we can monitor and fix any issues without long distance phone calls and walking non-technology users through diagnostics.

Who Knew: Data geeks knew…there are a lot of data jokes on the web…one of my favorite.

 

 

Exercise Induced Anaphylaxis?! You Betcha.

Facial angioedema from allergen exposure. Photo from Wikipedia.

Think you know everything about anaphylaxis? Every see a case of Exercise Induced Anaphylaxis (EIA)? The EM:RAP October podcast called; Exercise Induced Anaphylaxis by Jess Mason MD and Gita Pensa MD will give you hives…or at least goosebumps.

Points to ponder: Is there a relationship to food? Can EIA be fatal? What are the clues to diagnosis? All these answers and more await you in this October EM:RAP podcast.

Who Knew? Professor Charles Richet was a French physiologist who coined the term aphylaxis in 1902. This was later changed to anaphylaxis and his pioneering work in Immunology earned him a Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1913.

 

Mel Herbert: Keynote Address at ACEP’s 50th Anniversary Meeting

The American College of Emergency Medicine has an annual meeting and this year marked its 50th-anniversary conference in October 2018. Mel Herbert, Founder and Editor of Emergency Medicine: Reviews and Perspectives (EM:RAP) gave the keynote address. EM:RAP partners with Techies Without Borders to bring you monthly CMES and CMES-Pi.

His talk will spark your confidence no matter what type of medicine you practice…but if it happens to be Emergency Medicine…he lets you know how much you rock the world.

 

Crash Rapid Sequence Intubation (RSI): Clear the Runway for the Crashing Airway Patient

Twenty years ago I was a volunteer at a small rural hospital. A trauma patient was on the way in and I asked the nurse to prime two IV bags, open the BVM and ETT. She declined and said their policy was not to open supplies until at bedside. I get it…supplies are a resource not to be wasted…but having a dedicated airway kit prepped and ready at the bedside is crucial to RSI success.

The crash airway mnemonic SOAP ME runs down the list of everything you need for a successful Rapid Sequence Intubation (RSI) in the crashing airway patient. EM:RAP’s September podcast of Critical Care Mailbag: The Crash Checklist by Anand Swaminathan MD and Scott Weingart MD should be on everyone listening list.

Review what the mnemonic SOAP ME checklist stands for; how to temporize the crashing airway; how to treat the obstructed airway; and most importantly…tips on how to be ready for any airway headed for a crash and burn.

Heres a quick reference for SOAP ME. What’s in your kit? Leave a comment and start the dialogue.

Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Who Knew? William Macewan (1848-1924), a Glasgow surgeon, invented a type of endotracheal tube pictured. He was the first person to use an endotracheal tube to give a patient anaesthetic, in 1878. A tube was placed in the larynx to give the patient a dose of chloroform. These examples are made from steel and brass. They range in length from 210 mm to 80 mm for patients of all sizes.

 

Bone Up on Your Rongeur Skills

EMRAP‘s YouTube channel has a plethora of tutorial videos and today’s recommendation will take less than 3 minutes to view. Take a quick review of how to rongeur a fingertip bone to facilitate skin closure. Added bonus…how to make a finger tourniquet from a glove. View here.

Who Knew? Think of a rongeur as a heavy duty forceps used to remove bone. The word is derived from the French noun meaning “rodent” or the adjective meaning “gnawing”.

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