Nigeria’s Newest Hospital: The Helping Hands Specialist Hospital

Dr. Dare Ogunlusi is a surgeon in Nigeria. He participates in the CMES Project and had this to say, “I read “The Happy MD’s Guide to Physician Wellness” by Mike Drummond MD and Rob Orman MD. It is brief but loaded and will help my administrative skills.” Dr. Dare shared this recent accomplishment in establishing a new hospital with emergency services which was urgently needed in an outlying area of Ekiti State.

The Helping Hands Specialist Hospital (THHSH) is a subsidiary of Health Foundation Global Services Nigeria Limited registered in Nigeria in May 2011. The 30-bed healthcare facility was registered in October 2018 and Commissioned on 17th November 2018.  It will provide Orthopaedic and Trauma care, Accident and Emergency care, Medical, Mother and Childcare, Surgical, Training and Research facilities, and Laboratory services.

Our goal is to provide high quality, holistic, and affordable healthcare to all patients through our highly motivated staff and integrated health management system.  We aim to be healthcare providers to everyone irrespective of his or her status as a model of excellence for healthcare services.

THHSH is situated in a serene location within a green ambient environment where the air is clean and devoid of carbon pollution. It is located on the outskirt of Ado-Afao Road in Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State. The closest hospital facility to the location of THHSH is about 3km away. The population in the area is estimated to be about 5,000 households and building. The current occupation of these houses is estimated to be about 30%; that is, 1,500 households with an average of 4 family members. This gives a current total population of 6,000 people.

Anyone interested in supporting or visiting THHSH can contact Dr. Dare on Whatsapp- +17587192605.

 

 

 

Dr. Yan and Dr. Manoj’s Paper Accepted

Dr. Yan Li and Dr. Manoj Thomas will be presenting a paper at the The 15th International Conference on Social Implications of Computers in Developing Countries in Tanzania, May 1-3, 2019. https://2019ifipwg94.net
Well done Manoj and Yan for having a paper accepted at this important conference. In layman’s terms, they are recommending ToC to track ICT4D project outcomes, which can be a tricky prospect.

Title: Adopting Theory of Change for ICT4D project Impact Assessment

Dr. Manoj, Dr. Deb, Dr. Yan, Sarbu and Ben in San Francisco Dec. 2018.

Abstract: A compendium of impact assessment (IA) frameworks are available to understand the impact of ICT4D initiatives in Low-Income Countries. However, existing frameworks do not adequately address the unique challenges of IA for ICT4D, especially the multi-level and time variant characteristics of the IA. To address these challenges, we propose the use of Theory of change (ToC) as a generic framework for IA of ICT4D projects. Based on the seminal work by Weiss (1995), we argue that ToC can be viewed both as a methodology and a deep critical reflection process. We demonstrate the ToC approach for IA using a case study of an ICT4D project for LICs.

One of TWB’s goals for 2019 is to improve our tracking of CMES/CMES-Pi usage and ToC provides a framework for the project.

Meet Dr. Cristian Carreon, Santo Domingo, Ecuador

Dr. Cristian gives a thumbs up while using the CMES-Pi app to search for medical topics of interest.

Dr. Cristian is a full-time Family Practice doctor at the Centro de Salud Hombro a Hombro Clinic (CSHH) in Santo Domingo, Ecuador. CSHH was established in 2007 and partners with Timmy Global Health during brigades. The clinic has three medical exam rooms, dental room and services, an office and a pharmacy. This small but mighty clinic, staffed by two nurses, one part-time and Dr. Cristian, serves approximately 20,000 patients from the poor urban neighborhoods each year.

Centro de Salud Hombro a Hombro Clinic (CSHH) in Santo Domingo, Ecuador.

Dr. Cristian and his staff have few opportunities or financial resources to attend continuing medical education (CME) conferences in Santo Domingo or Quito. A CMES Raspberry-Pi device was installed in the clinic and using smartphone apps the doctors and nurses can access free CME at the clinic. Every month about 20 new topics are available in Spanish as PDF files.

Mel Herbert: Keynote Address at ACEP’s 50th Anniversary Meeting

The American College of Emergency Medicine has an annual meeting and this year marked its 50th-anniversary conference in October 2018. Mel Herbert, Founder and Editor of Emergency Medicine: Reviews and Perspectives (EM:RAP) gave the keynote address. EM:RAP partners with Techies Without Borders to bring you monthly CMES and CMES-Pi.

His talk will spark your confidence no matter what type of medicine you practice…but if it happens to be Emergency Medicine…he lets you know how much you rock the world.

 

Thumbs Up Nigeria

Meet Dr. Dare Ogunlusi from Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria. He is an attending in the Department of Accident and Emergency.

He is the newest recipient and participant in CMES. Techies Without Borders (TWB) was referred to Dr. Dare by his friend and colleague Dr. Lisa Charles from Victoria Hospital in St. Lucia. TWB mailed a thumb drive to Dr. Dare after discussing the cme options that would best work for him. He will be testing the thumb drive and providing feedback on usability and content for his specific location.

CME development and utilization face challenges worldwide because resources are limited and infrastructure for the delivery of healthcare and information is fragile. Feedback from locations around the globe helps us improve our services and products. If you have colleagues who would be interested in either CMES or CMES-Pi, please contact Dr. Debra Stoner at: deb.twb@gmail.com

Gastric Lavage: Yes or No?

Antique gastric pump.
(Wikimedia Commons photo)

According to an EMRAP article, orogastric lavage was considered a standard procedure. It has never been proven to be of benefit. There are no recent studies. Although it was thought that removing the gastric contents might decrease the severity of the overdose, this is probably not the case. Why? Listen to the podcast or read the bullet points of the May 2018 article called “Pumping the Stomach” No More, by Anand Swaminathan MD and Sean Nordt MD, PharmD.

Do you still lavage for poison overdose? What substances? Leave a comment and share your knowledge.

Who Knew? Unlike many of our simpler medical and surgical instruments, mention of the stomach and duodenal tubes is not to be found in the classical writings of the ancient Greek and Arabian physicians…the somewhat uncertain origin of the stomach tube may be placed at about 144 years ago. Precursors of the stomach tube, however, were in common usage as early as the days of Imperial Rome. (Annals of Internal Medicine; The History of the Invention and Development of the Stomach and Duodenal Tubes by John R. Paine, MD)

 

 

 

Leeches: Friend or Foe

Leech
(WikiMedia Commons photos)

My experience with leeches is limited to a profound fear while hiking during the Nepal monsoon season where the rainforest leeches drop from the vegetation and make you their personal smorgasbord.

Have you ever used a leech medically to reduce swelling and vascular congestion? How do you remove leeches? How do you treat the wounds? Leave a comment and share your skills with us leech-less colleagues.

Who Knew? Leeches have 32 Brains. Their internal structure is divided into 32 segments. Each of these 32 segments has its own segment of the brain. Every leech also has two reproductive organs and 9 pairs of testes.

Dr. Lisa Floats on a Wave of CME in St. Lucia

Dr. Lisa Charles, ED Director at Victoria Hospital, St. Lucia.

St. Lucia Pitons, World Heritage site. (Wikimedia)

Dr. Lisa Charles at Victoria Hospital in St. Lucia runs a tight ship on this Caribbean island. Emergency Medicine trained, she embraces continuing medical education (cme) as a means to keep her staff up-to-date. The staff at Victoria Hospital received thumb drives this past February and are putting them to good use. Several years ago she wrote a procedures manual for her ED staff at Victoria Hospital and is using the CMES articles to update her information.

Living on a small Caribbean island poses challenges for travel and access to cme credits which are mandatory for physicians in St. Lucia. She is permitted by the St. Lucian Medical Council to authorize articles as cme credits for her staff. She is also using CMES to provide some of the mandatory cme credit for her staff.

Who Knew? Together with Caribbean music genres such as Calypso, Soca, Dancehall, Reggae, Compas, Zouk, and Salsa, Saint Lucia has a strong country music tradition. In the 1950s the only radio stations heard in St. Lucia was from Texas, USA, where country music was popular. Even today you can hear George Jones, Patsy Cline and Johnny Cash’s voices drifting out of neighborhood bars.

 

The Dominica Republic Gets a Piece of CMES-Pi

Banelino is a fair trade banana cooperative that partners with TGH to support local healthcare in the DR.

Dr. Yari Rodriguez in Mao, a coastal community on the Haitian border, and Dr. Miguel Garcia in Monti Christi, a northwestern urban city, in the Dominica Republic (DR) are the newest users of CMES-Pi. The doctors are local partners in healthcare with Timmy Global Health (TGH), an Indianapolis based nonprofit that provides access to healthcare through volunteers and empowering local health providers worldwide.

 

Dr. Manoj Thomas, from TWB, joined the TGH medical brigade in March. He assisted Anny, the local TGH Program Manager, on installation and how to use the Pi device including the smartphone apps for her DR staff.

Anny, TGH project director in the DR, is ready install the CMES-Pi unit.

CMES-Pi…so little providing so much cme.

The doctors in these clinics are providing care in austere rural settings. Accessing the EMRAP cme gives them a source of updated medical information to provide the best care possible for their patients.

Dr. Yari (on the right) in Mao meets CMES-Pi.

Dr. Miguel gets a lesson from Anny on the smartphone app.

Who Knew? The DR is the largest producer of organic bananas worldwide, representing more than 55% of the world’s organic banana production. The DR also makes one of the best rums in the world…banana daiquiri anyone?

 



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