Pediatric Airway: Crash Review

Photo from Wikimedia.

Most of us are anxious about taking care of infants and children younger than 2 years old who need airway support. It’s intimidating and challenging to face a small airway when most of us face this critical situation only a few times a year. It’s imperative to stay current and review the procedure and medications regularly. The September EM:RAP C3 podcast on Pediatric Airways hits all the vital landmarks for troubleshooting and management. Expertly presented by Jessica Mason MD, Mel Herbert MD, and Stuart Swadron MD, you will take home points such as; Infants and children have a much smaller pulmonary reserve than adults; thus they desaturate much more quickly after preoxygenation. More empowering take-home points await you so take a listen and share the knowledge.

Photo from Wikimedia.

Who Knew: Dr. Crawford Long administered the first documented ether anesthetic to an 8-year-old boy for a toe amputation on July 3, 1842.

 

 

Every Village and Every Health Practitioner

Dr. Christian, Santo Domingo Clinic, Ecuador

We are passionate about the Continuing Medical Education on Stick (CMES) Project which delivers cme to hundreds of medical practitioners globally. We couldn’t do this without the generous in-kind donation of the cme content from our sponsor, Emergency Medicine Reviews and Perspectives (EM:RAP). Mel Herbert, EM:RAP CEO, shared his philosophy in this article.

Thank you, Dr. Mel, for your foresight and wisdom.

Who Knew? “Europe’s formal medical education system started in the late Middle Ages, with the rise of the universities in what is now Northern Italy. From approximately ad 1100 until the mid-19th century, two tiers of medical practitioners existed: (1) academic doctors and (2) practically trained surgeons (which consisted of a motley collection of practitioners, including barber–surgeons, traveling practitioners, ship’s surgeons, tooth extractors, etc.).” Read the full article here.

Flip the Social Media Switch

Glenda, Community Health nurse, Tena, Ecuador.

Social media metrics provides support when applying for grants and shows our partners and donors that the CME Project is successful. Help us flip the switch for equal continuing medical education opportunity globally for all health providers.

Techies Without Borders is on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram. Connect and share to support our CMES Project which provides free continuing medical education to doctors and nurses in developing countries.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techieswob/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/34219833/admin/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/TechiesWB

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/techieswithoutborders/

A Honey of an Idea


Meet Dr. Vera Sistenich, an Emergency Medicine physician from Sydney, Australia. Dr. Vera is the Project Leader for HandsUp Congo, an Australian nonprofit, “Building a Healthy Congo” Project. In collaboration with local partners and the Democratic Republic of Congo’s (DRC) government they are committed to bring Emergency Medicine training and integration to the DRC healthcare system. This is her story on one way she supports their goals.

“I started in 2015 when I lived in a seaside suburb here in Sydney called Coogee. As a child, I grew up in Hong Kong (my Mum is Chinese) but our family spent our summer holidays in Germany (my Dad is from Munich). We had a very rural home in a Bavarian suburb next to a forest. Our neighbour, an old man, used to keep his hives in the forest which I used to pass walking our little sausage dog daily. I was always fascinated, and we could see the old man at night through the window processing wax and honey. I thought to myself as a girl I’d love to keep bees one day. When I moved to Sydney and bought my own home for the first time, I came across The Urban Beehive, a business and movement promoting responsible beekeeping in the urban environment. The owners Doug Purdie and Vicky Brown are Australian beekeeping royalty now! I did a course with them and then started my own hive in the outdoor area of my ground floor unit in Coogee.

The weather here is so good that my one hive was producing around 100kg of honey a year. There are only so many birthday and Christmas presents you can make with all this honey! This volume would give around 300 jars a year, so I tried my hand at a little social enterprise, creating a label called “Coogee Bees for Congo” and selling each jar for AUD $15 and putting all the profit towards our Congo EM Project. There is a famous building in Coogee right by the beach called The Coogee Pavilion. It has a blue and white dome, which is what inspired the blue and white bee of my label, set within the contour of the landmass of the DRCongo. I changed the sting of the bee into a little heart, a reminder to myself of our duty to translate compassion into practice towards those in need everywhere. 

I now have 2 hives, producing about 200kg per year. I have raised over AUD $ 10,000 since the start of the project with the honey.

Beekeeping is very successful in the city. The Sydney Bee Club, of which I’m a committee member, has partnered with several universities here for research, providing dead bees and honey samples from our members from numerous suburbs. It turns out that the honey produced in cities is less contaminated with chemicals and pesticides than a lot of rural honeys and the flavours more complex due to the diversity plants and lack of monocultures in the urban setting. Heavy metals from the city environment are stored within the bodies of the bees themselves and secreted somewhat into the wax, but not into the honey. This came as a big and welcomed surprise to us all. Challenges, though, included minimising swarming in the urban environment so our hives don’t become a public nuisance, and adhering to rules and regulations regarding safety towards our neighbours. The practice is popular here and encouraged by our local counsellors. 

I don’t do any formal marketing as such. I work at two hospitals here in Sydney and just by word of mouth, colleagues, family and friends buy out the honey every time. I post on Facebook when I have a new batch and also on the HandUp Congo Facebook page. I also make candles from the wax as gifts.

In addition to raising funds for the EM project, one year, we chanced upon the only beekeeper training collective in the whole of the Congo whilst traveling to one of our teaching sites by road. From that, a completely separate Be A Honey Project was born – we have raised funds to bring these experts to the remote village of Lotumbe, where Lucy of HandUp Congo grew up, to train them in sustainable beekeeping, in particular to empower the Pygmy population there.”

Introducing C3: Continuous Core Content

Photo from Wikimedia.

WooHoo…C3 is here for your listening and viewing pleasure! EM:RAP has generously provided Techies Without Borders their C3 content to add to our cloud based server. This CME content is available to participants using either the thumb drive (USB) or Raspberry-Pi access options. It will be in a separate folder and you can use the Search for specific topics.

C3 is a clinical based review on how to assess and treat common and grave Emergency Department and Urgent Care complaints. It’s ideal for all practitioners wanting to review the basics efficiently and quickly. Think of it as your basic Lego set.

The same great MP3 and PDF formats are available. The audio file contains a focused summary at the end of the talk, so if you are short on time you can fast forward. The PDF files start off with the all important Take Home Points for a quick update. You can also test your knowledge with the uploaded questions and answers.

Build up or reinforce your basic knowledge with C3. Thank you EM:RAP.

Who Knew? “The Lego Group began in the workshop of Ole Kirk Christiansen (1891–1958), a carpenter from Billund, Denmark, who began making wooden toys in 1932.[7][8] In 1934, his company came to be called “Lego” derived from the Danish phrase leg godt [lɑjˀ ˈɡʌd], which means “play well”.” (Wikipedia)

 

 

DevelopingEM: A Model for Emergency Medicine Collaboration

Dr.Mereoni Voce from Labasa Hospital at the DevelopingEM Conference in Fiji.

DevelopingEM is a partner of Techies Without Borders. DevelopingEM is a nonprofit corporation from Australia with a model to promote and develop Emergency Medicine globally through collaboration. Last December Dr. Deb was invited to speak at their sixth conference in Fiji. Each conference is designed to deliver excellent emergency medicine and critical care content. Not only is the conference for practicing EM specialists but the model brings local health providers to the conference supported by the conference fees and contributions. They encourage global collaboration between countries where EM is developing and gaining momentum as a specialty.

DevelopingEM is heading to Cartagena, Colombia for their seventh Emergency Medicine and Critical Care conference. Consider joining them in March 2020 for a chance to support this forward-thinking team.

Meet Dr. Cristian Carreon, Santo Domingo, Ecuador

Dr. Cristian gives a thumbs up while using the CMES-Pi app to search for medical topics of interest.

Dr. Cristian is a full-time Family Practice doctor at the Centro de Salud Hombro a Hombro Clinic (CSHH) in Santo Domingo, Ecuador. CSHH was established in 2007 and partners with Timmy Global Health during brigades. The clinic has three medical exam rooms, dental room and services, an office and a pharmacy. This small but mighty clinic, staffed by two nurses, one part-time and Dr. Cristian, serves approximately 20,000 patients from the poor urban neighborhoods each year.

Centro de Salud Hombro a Hombro Clinic (CSHH) in Santo Domingo, Ecuador.

Dr. Cristian and his staff have few opportunities or financial resources to attend continuing medical education (CME) conferences in Santo Domingo or Quito. A CMES Raspberry-Pi device was installed in the clinic and using smartphone apps the doctors and nurses can access free CME at the clinic. Every month about 20 new topics are available in Spanish as PDF files.

Ecuador Gets a Slice of CMES-Pi

Dr. Debra Stoner departs this week to install CMES-Pi at two sites and dispense CMES thumb drives at two other sites in Ecuador, including Quito, Santo Domingo, Guangaje, and Tena.

The CMES thumb drives and CMES-Pi give rural doctors and nurses access to cutting-edge continuing medical education (CME). Timmy Global Health, a Techies Without Borders (TWB) partner, works alongside local health providers in Ecuador to provide healthcare in remote regions. The CME is provided free of charge by another TWB partner, Emergency Medicine Reviews and Perspectives (EM:RAP).

Visit TWB Twitter, Instagram and Facebook pages for more photos later this week.

Dataplicity

Dr. Manoj Thomas and Dataplicity Founder, Elliot Mackenzie, London, England May 2018.

Techies Without Borders (TWB) partners with Dataplicity. Dataplicity is the foundation for IoT remote support and provides TWB with a generous allowance to keep track of our Raspberry-Pi data.

IoT = Internet of Things…sounds like a scifi book but means using the “Internet” as the backbone of connectivity and the “Things” are your devices. Your things collect data and send it to the Internet. Put it all together and IoT converts a normal device into a smart device. TWB installs Dataplicty on CMES-Pis before it gets to the clinics and hospitals. With Dataplicity, we are able to manage and update CMES-Pi devices located in remote and hard to reach areas. This means we can monitor and fix any issues without long distance phone calls and walking non-technology users through diagnostics.

Who Knew: Data geeks knew…there are a lot of data jokes on the web…one of my favorite.

 

 

Go Fund Me: Give a Slice of CMES-Pi Success

 

The Techies Without Borders team thanks everyone who donated, sent words of encouragement and shared our Go Fund Me page on their social media. We raised $2000 USD in two weeks.

The funding supports installation of CMES-Pi units in Mbarara University of Science and Technology and Makerere University Hospital, Uganda; Mount St John’s Medical Centre, Antigua; Victoria Hospital, St. Lucia; Timmy Global Health (TGH) partner clinics in Quito, Santa Domingo, and Tena, Ecuador; and USB drives TGH’s Guangaji Clinic, Ecuador.

Who Knew? TWB slowly formed as two university professors, Dr. Manoj Thomas and Dr. Yan Li, along with their graduate students worked on social-driven educational IT projects for their studies. A mutual friend invited Manoj to meet her mom, Dr. Debra Stoner. Over dinner…Manoj and Deb formed a friendship based on mutual respect and their passions to bring education to those with limited access…CMES was born and in 2018 TWB incorporated as a 501c3 nonprofit corporation. We are committed for the long haul.

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