Every Village and Every Health Practitioner

Dr. Christian, Santo Domingo Clinic, Ecuador

We are passionate about the Continuing Medical Education on Stick (CMES) Project which delivers cme to hundreds of medical practitioners globally. We couldn’t do this without the generous in-kind donation of the cme content from our sponsor, Emergency Medicine Reviews and Perspectives (EM:RAP). Mel Herbert, EM:RAP CEO, shared his philosophy in this article.

Thank you, Dr. Mel, for your foresight and wisdom.

Who Knew? “Europe’s formal medical education system started in the late Middle Ages, with the rise of the universities in what is now Northern Italy. From approximately ad 1100 until the mid-19th century, two tiers of medical practitioners existed: (1) academic doctors and (2) practically trained surgeons (which consisted of a motley collection of practitioners, including barber–surgeons, traveling practitioners, ship’s surgeons, tooth extractors, etc.).” Read the full article here.

A Honey of an Idea


Meet Dr. Vera Sistenich, an Emergency Medicine physician from Sydney, Australia. Dr. Vera is the Project Leader for HandsUp Congo, an Australian nonprofit, “Building a Healthy Congo” Project. In collaboration with local partners and the Democratic Republic of Congo’s (DRC) government they are committed to bring Emergency Medicine training and integration to the DRC healthcare system. This is her story on one way she supports their goals.

“I started in 2015 when I lived in a seaside suburb here in Sydney called Coogee. As a child, I grew up in Hong Kong (my Mum is Chinese) but our family spent our summer holidays in Germany (my Dad is from Munich). We had a very rural home in a Bavarian suburb next to a forest. Our neighbour, an old man, used to keep his hives in the forest which I used to pass walking our little sausage dog daily. I was always fascinated, and we could see the old man at night through the window processing wax and honey. I thought to myself as a girl I’d love to keep bees one day. When I moved to Sydney and bought my own home for the first time, I came across The Urban Beehive, a business and movement promoting responsible beekeeping in the urban environment. The owners Doug Purdie and Vicky Brown are Australian beekeeping royalty now! I did a course with them and then started my own hive in the outdoor area of my ground floor unit in Coogee.

The weather here is so good that my one hive was producing around 100kg of honey a year. There are only so many birthday and Christmas presents you can make with all this honey! This volume would give around 300 jars a year, so I tried my hand at a little social enterprise, creating a label called “Coogee Bees for Congo” and selling each jar for AUD $15 and putting all the profit towards our Congo EM Project. There is a famous building in Coogee right by the beach called The Coogee Pavilion. It has a blue and white dome, which is what inspired the blue and white bee of my label, set within the contour of the landmass of the DRCongo. I changed the sting of the bee into a little heart, a reminder to myself of our duty to translate compassion into practice towards those in need everywhere. 

I now have 2 hives, producing about 200kg per year. I have raised over AUD $ 10,000 since the start of the project with the honey.

Beekeeping is very successful in the city. The Sydney Bee Club, of which I’m a committee member, has partnered with several universities here for research, providing dead bees and honey samples from our members from numerous suburbs. It turns out that the honey produced in cities is less contaminated with chemicals and pesticides than a lot of rural honeys and the flavours more complex due to the diversity plants and lack of monocultures in the urban setting. Heavy metals from the city environment are stored within the bodies of the bees themselves and secreted somewhat into the wax, but not into the honey. This came as a big and welcomed surprise to us all. Challenges, though, included minimising swarming in the urban environment so our hives don’t become a public nuisance, and adhering to rules and regulations regarding safety towards our neighbours. The practice is popular here and encouraged by our local counsellors. 

I don’t do any formal marketing as such. I work at two hospitals here in Sydney and just by word of mouth, colleagues, family and friends buy out the honey every time. I post on Facebook when I have a new batch and also on the HandUp Congo Facebook page. I also make candles from the wax as gifts.

In addition to raising funds for the EM project, one year, we chanced upon the only beekeeper training collective in the whole of the Congo whilst traveling to one of our teaching sites by road. From that, a completely separate Be A Honey Project was born – we have raised funds to bring these experts to the remote village of Lotumbe, where Lucy of HandUp Congo grew up, to train them in sustainable beekeeping, in particular to empower the Pygmy population there.”

What’s the Buzz About Honey?

Manuka honey (Wikipedia)

The May edition of Emergency Medical Reviews and Perspectives (EM:RAP), your CME sponsor for the Continuing Medical Education on Stick (CMES) Project, has an article on the use of honey in the emergency department or outpatient clinic. The commonly known medical uses for honey include cough suppression and skin wound antibacterial agent. Other uses that can be life saving are cited in the article titled, Honey for Everything by Ilene Claudius MD and Sol Behar MD. Buzz on over to your thumb drive or CMES-Pi and take a listen or read. It’ll sweeten your day.

 

Five-petaled white flowers and round buds on twigs bearing short spiky leaves. A dark bee is in the centre of one of the flowers.

Manuka bloom (Wikipedia)

Who Knew? The antibacterial effects of honey vary widely depending on the type and production location as cited by Willix et al. of the University of Waikato in New Zealand. Manuka honey found in New Zealand is reported to have high antibacterial activity.

 

CMES-Pi Participant Highlight: Mount St. John’s Medical Center, Antigua

Meet Dr. Vonetta George who works at Mount St. John’s Medical Center (MSJMC) in Antigua. Dr. Vonetta works in all critical care areas of the hospital including supervising the 15 doctors and 2 dozen+ nurses in the Emergency Department.

Antigua is located in the West Indies, a Leeward Island in the Caribbean. Mount St. John’s serves the population of Antigua and also Barbuda. Working on an isolated island directly affects the doctors and nurses ability to access current continuing medical education in a cost effective manner. Dr. Vonetta was the gail force hurricane behind getting the CMES-Pi Project installed in her hospital. MSJMC installed a CMES-Pi in June last year. Using our smart phone apps the staff can look up CME current practice topics at bedside. The CME is provided by our partner Emergency Medicine Reviews and Perspectives. The PDF files provide helpful bullet points and take seconds to read. The MP3 files are providing topics for weekly group CME conferences and discussions. The CMES-Pi Project directly impacts access to CME for 101 doctors and 179 nurses at the hospital. Thank you Dr. Vonetta!

Who Knew? The first inhabitants were the Siboney, who can be dated back to 2400 BCE. Arawaks settled subsequently, around the 1st century CE. The Caribs arrived later, but abandoned Antigua around the 16th century, due to the shortage of fresh water. Christopher Columbus sighted the larger island in 1493, and named it after a church in Seville, Santa Maria de la Antigua. (Commonwealth)

Congestive Heart Failure: Bring on the Leeches?

Wikimedia photo.

The April edition of Right on Prime covers everything you need to know about congestive heart failure from the definition to palliative care, including advice on therapeutic phlebotomy. No matter where you practice you will find breath-taking take home points. Take a listen or read: The Generalist: Acute and End Stage CHF in the ED by Vanessa Cardy MD, Mel Herbert MD, and Heidi James MD in the April edition of Right on Prime available to all CMES participants using either the CMES thumb drive or Pi.

Leech application tubes and blood letting tool, probably from 1800s. Photo from Wikimedia.

Who Knew? Bloodletting (or blood-letting) is the withdrawal of blood from a patient to prevent or cure illness and disease. Bloodletting, now called therapeutic phlebotomy, whether by a physician or by leeches, was based on an ancient system of medicine in which blood and other bodily fluids were regarded as “humours” that had to remain in proper balance to maintain health. It is claimed to have been the most common medical practice performed by surgeons from antiquity until the late 19th century, a span of almost 2,000 years. (article content from Wikipedia)

C3: Psychiatric Emergencies Part 2

Wikimedia image.

Last week I introduced you to C3, Continuous Core Content, the newest medical education available to all CMES and CMES-Pi participants. The March C3 content is part two of psychiatric emergencies covering depression, anxiety and eating disorders. You can access the C3 folder with the thumb drive or the smartphone apps using the CMES-Pi.

Do you know what endocrine disorder can mimic depression or that pulmonary emboli can present with a common and misleading psychiatric complaint? A quick read of the Take Home Points will lift your spirits and lessen your anxiety when faced with a psychiatric emergency.

Who Knew? Psychiatric illness were recognized over 4000 years ago In the second millennium B.C. in Mesopotamia where there are written accounts of depression. It was thought to be a spiritual condition and therefor treated by priests instead of healers.

Aneurysms: It’ll Blow Your Mind

Abdominal aorta MRI. (Wikimedia)

Practicing in rural and remote regions globally with limited staff and resources poses challenges not faced by your colleagues in larger cities and academic centers. Case presentations from those working in rural regions help us understand the restrictions, challenges, and downright genius solutions from treating to to saving a life. I find these stories uplifting, invigorating, and deserving of a standing ovation.

Take a listen or read about The Case of the Man with the Aneurysm by Vanessa Cardy MD and Mel Herbert MD in the EM:RAP April files. It’ll expand your knowledge.

 

Who Knew?

On 17 April 1955, Einstein experienced a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, which had previously been reinforced surgically by a surgeon in 1948. He took the draft of a speech he was preparing for a television appearance commemorating the State of Israel’s seventh anniversary with him to the hospital, but he did not live long enough to complete it. Einstein refused surgery, saying, “I want to go when I want. It is tasteless to prolong life artificially. I have done my share; it is time to go. I will do it elegantly.” He died early the next morning at the age of 76, having continued to work until near the end. (Wikipedia)

 

DevelopingEM: A Model for Emergency Medicine Collaboration

Dr.Mereoni Voce from Labasa Hospital at the DevelopingEM Conference in Fiji.

DevelopingEM is a partner of Techies Without Borders. DevelopingEM is a nonprofit corporation from Australia with a model to promote and develop Emergency Medicine globally through collaboration. Last December Dr. Deb was invited to speak at their sixth conference in Fiji. Each conference is designed to deliver excellent emergency medicine and critical care content. Not only is the conference for practicing EM specialists but the model brings local health providers to the conference supported by the conference fees and contributions. They encourage global collaboration between countries where EM is developing and gaining momentum as a specialty.

DevelopingEM is heading to Cartagena, Colombia for their seventh Emergency Medicine and Critical Care conference. Consider joining them in March 2020 for a chance to support this forward-thinking team.

Giant Cell Arteritis

I’m looking at cases to post and found one that could be me…because I’m over 60. Here’s the lowdown: over 60 years old with sudden vision loss? over 60 years old with transient vision loss? over 60 years old with transient double vision? Think Giant Cell Arteritis and take a listen to the March EM:RAP podcast: Giant Cell Arteritis by Ilene Claudius MD and Edward Margolin MD.

Or take a quick look at the PDF and bring home the take home points…it’ll make you a giant in the know.

Who Knew? Tales of giants are found in many cultures. The word giant, first attested in 1297, was derived from the Gigantes (Greek: Γίγαντες[1]) of Greek mythology. (Wikipedia)

Somewhere Over the Rainbow

Dorothy’s original ruby slippers (Wikicommons)

Neonatal stools are a source of concern for parents and color changes can trigger a visit to the emergency department or outpatient clinic. What colors raise your index of concern for serious pathologies such as necrotizing enterocolitis, malrotation with midgut volvulus or intussusception? Plug in your thumb drive or roll out your CMES app and take a listen to Jess Mason MD and Jason Woods MD as they discuss the EM:RAP podcast called Neonatal Stool Rainbow. You won’t find the Wizard of Oz but you’ll take home some knowledge…even without your ruby slippers.

 

 

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