Funding: A Funny Thing

Asking for donations isn’t easy. There are many organizations doing vital work in small and large communities…we understand the barrage of requests especially in the world of social media. But the facts are…we can’t operate without donations. Each of us on Techies Without Borders donates our time and skills. We are asking each of you to donate to our project at Global Giving Accelerator Fundraiser. The goal is $5000 USD in 17 days…to fund our next CMES Project for HandUp Congo in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Donate here

Thank you for your support.

Giant Cell Arteritis

I’m looking at cases to post and found one that could be me…because I’m over 60. Here’s the lowdown: over 60 years old with sudden vision loss? over 60 years old with transient vision loss? over 60 years old with transient double vision? Think Giant Cell Arteritis and take a listen to the March EM:RAP podcast: Giant Cell Arteritis by Ilene Claudius MD and Edward Margolin MD.

Or take a quick look at the PDF and bring home the take home points…it’ll make you a giant in the know.

Who Knew? Tales of giants are found in many cultures. The word giant, first attested in 1297, was derived from the Gigantes (Greek: Γίγαντες[1]) of Greek mythology. (Wikipedia)

Somewhere Over the Rainbow

Dorothy’s original ruby slippers (Wikicommons)

Neonatal stools are a source of concern for parents and color changes can trigger a visit to the emergency department or outpatient clinic. What colors raise your index of concern for serious pathologies such as necrotizing enterocolitis, malrotation with midgut volvulus or intussusception? Plug in your thumb drive or roll out your CMES app and take a listen to Jess Mason MD and Jason Woods MD as they discuss the EM:RAP podcast called Neonatal Stool Rainbow. You won’t find the Wizard of Oz but you’ll take home some knowledge…even without your ruby slippers.

 

 

Rural Medicine: Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Glucometer. Courtesy Wikicommons.

Once a month I will comment on the Rural Medicine podcast from EM:RAP. It’s exciting to read CME that can be applied globally no matter where you live or what resources you have at hand. Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) In The Village by Vanessa Cardy MD and Stuart Swadron MD can be found in the February 2019 EM:RAP podcasts or take a quick read of the PDF for bullet points.

The question of the month? How do you manage DKA when you don’t have access to labs? 

Urine dip strip. Courtesy Wikicommons.

And…is the urine ketone strip a good test?

Pediatric Wisdom

Pediatric patients at mobile clinic, Tena, Ecuador.

Each month EM:RAP offers a podcast called Pediatric Pearls. Take a listen or read the January edition titled: Pediatric Gynecology Complaints by Ilene Claudius MD and Emily Willner MD. Neonates with blood in the diaper, difficult catheterizations, and how are vaginal exams different in children are a few of the useful topics covered.

Share your experiences and advice. How does your facility manage pediatric emergencies?

 

 

Stress & Burnout

Your working at 5000 rpms as patient after patient after patient arrives at your Emergency Department for treatment. It’s a typical shift but this one never stops gaining momentum until you and the staff are at the breaking point. You think you can manage, but like any excellent racer…some days you can hit a wall, flame and die.

Take a listen or read the August 2018 EM:RAP podcast and PDF called; “Beating Burnout” by Annahieta Kalantari DO. It’s there for you to access using a CMES-Pi or the CMES thumb drives and it’s worth a listen. Even being retired, I was able to understand better why I felt the way I did and what happens to all of us as we deliver medical care.

Take care of yourself and your staff…it’s the only way to win the race.

 

 

Introducing C3: Continuous Core Content

C3 = Continuous Core Content. C3 is now available as a podcast or PDF files with the CMES Project. This is EM:RAP’s clinical reviews of how to approach and take care of patients with serious and common Emergency Department and Urgent care complaints. These are the basics and provide rock-solid skills to your clinical knowledge base. Each month you will find a new topic ranging from Wound Management to Adult Pneumonia. Participants with CMES-Pi can access starting January 2019. CMES thumb drive participants who receive their thumb drives after January 1, 2019 can access the C3 content along with all the other great EM:RAP CME content.

Sudden vision loss is bad. Take a listen or read from the January C3 titled: Acute Vision Loss by Jessica Mason MD, Stuart Swadron and MD, Mel Herbert MD. For those with ultrasound capabilities watch the YouTube video: Ultrasound of Retinal vs. Vitreous Detachment

Nigeria’s Newest Hospital: The Helping Hands Specialist Hospital

Dr. Dare Ogunlusi is a surgeon in Nigeria. He participates in the CMES Project and had this to say, “I read “The Happy MD’s Guide to Physician Wellness” by Mike Drummond MD and Rob Orman MD. It is brief but loaded and will help my administrative skills.” Dr. Dare shared this recent accomplishment in establishing a new hospital with emergency services which was urgently needed in an outlying area of Ekiti State.

The Helping Hands Specialist Hospital (THHSH) is a subsidiary of Health Foundation Global Services Nigeria Limited registered in Nigeria in May 2011. The 30-bed healthcare facility was registered in October 2018 and Commissioned on 17th November 2018.  It will provide Orthopaedic and Trauma care, Accident and Emergency care, Medical, Mother and Childcare, Surgical, Training and Research facilities, and Laboratory services.

Our goal is to provide high quality, holistic, and affordable healthcare to all patients through our highly motivated staff and integrated health management system.  We aim to be healthcare providers to everyone irrespective of his or her status as a model of excellence for healthcare services.

THHSH is situated in a serene location within a green ambient environment where the air is clean and devoid of carbon pollution. It is located on the outskirt of Ado-Afao Road in Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State. The closest hospital facility to the location of THHSH is about 3km away. The population in the area is estimated to be about 5,000 households and building. The current occupation of these houses is estimated to be about 30%; that is, 1,500 households with an average of 4 family members. This gives a current total population of 6,000 people.

Anyone interested in supporting or visiting THHSH can contact Dr. Dare on Whatsapp- +17587192605.

 

 

 

Dr. Yan and Dr. Manoj’s Paper Accepted

Dr. Yan Li and Dr. Manoj Thomas will be presenting a paper at the The 15th International Conference on Social Implications of Computers in Developing Countries in Tanzania, May 1-3, 2019. https://2019ifipwg94.net
Well done Manoj and Yan for having a paper accepted at this important conference. In layman’s terms, they are recommending ToC to track ICT4D project outcomes, which can be a tricky prospect.

Title: Adopting Theory of Change for ICT4D project Impact Assessment

Dr. Manoj, Dr. Deb, Dr. Yan, Sarbu and Ben in San Francisco Dec. 2018.

Abstract: A compendium of impact assessment (IA) frameworks are available to understand the impact of ICT4D initiatives in Low-Income Countries. However, existing frameworks do not adequately address the unique challenges of IA for ICT4D, especially the multi-level and time variant characteristics of the IA. To address these challenges, we propose the use of Theory of change (ToC) as a generic framework for IA of ICT4D projects. Based on the seminal work by Weiss (1995), we argue that ToC can be viewed both as a methodology and a deep critical reflection process. We demonstrate the ToC approach for IA using a case study of an ICT4D project for LICs.

One of TWB’s goals for 2019 is to improve our tracking of CMES/CMES-Pi usage and ToC provides a framework for the project.

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