Pediatric Airway: Crash Review

Photo from Wikimedia.

Most of us are anxious about taking care of infants and children younger than 2 years old who need airway support. It’s intimidating and challenging to face a small airway when most of us face this critical situation only a few times a year. It’s imperative to stay current and review the procedure and medications regularly. The September EM:RAP C3 podcast on Pediatric Airways hits all the vital landmarks for troubleshooting and management. Expertly presented by Jessica Mason MD, Mel Herbert MD, and Stuart Swadron MD, you will take home points such as; Infants and children have a much smaller pulmonary reserve than adults; thus they desaturate much more quickly after preoxygenation. More empowering take-home points await you so take a listen and share the knowledge.

Photo from Wikimedia.

Who Knew: Dr. Crawford Long administered the first documented ether anesthetic to an 8-year-old boy for a toe amputation on July 3, 1842.

 

 

Every Village and Every Health Practitioner

Dr. Christian, Santo Domingo Clinic, Ecuador

We are passionate about the Continuing Medical Education on Stick (CMES) Project which delivers cme to hundreds of medical practitioners globally. We couldn’t do this without the generous in-kind donation of the cme content from our sponsor, Emergency Medicine Reviews and Perspectives (EM:RAP). Mel Herbert, EM:RAP CEO, shared his philosophy in this article.

Thank you, Dr. Mel, for your foresight and wisdom.

Who Knew? “Europe’s formal medical education system started in the late Middle Ages, with the rise of the universities in what is now Northern Italy. From approximately ad 1100 until the mid-19th century, two tiers of medical practitioners existed: (1) academic doctors and (2) practically trained surgeons (which consisted of a motley collection of practitioners, including barber–surgeons, traveling practitioners, ship’s surgeons, tooth extractors, etc.).” Read the full article here.

Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) 10th Edition: Stemming the Hemorrhage of Misinformation

ATLS was a mandatory course during my emergency medicine training with recertification every few years. One of the greatest benefits was recognizing the need to asign a leader and develop a systematic approach to the trauma patient. There is always controvrsy surrounding proptocols and recommendations but the 10th edition is based on decades of trauma experience.

One of the new changes in the shock and circulation section is an emphasis on tourniquets, packing and the application of pressure; some very basic methods that can quickly control hemorrhage. Where do you focus your attention first? Airway? Hemorrhage control?

Wherever you practice and no matter the resources available you will find something in this podcast to strengthen your skills. Take a listen to the September 2019 EM:RAP podcast or read the PDF called: Trauma Surgeons Gone Wild: ATLS 10th edition update by Stuart Swadron MD, Kenji Inaba MD, and Billy Mallon MD.

 

Morell Wellcome tourniquets. (courtesy WikiMedia Commons)

Who Knew? The first recorded efforts to prevent arterial bleeding has been ascribed to Sushruta, the father of surgical art and science, in 600 B.C At that time, he pressed the arteries with pieces of leather that he made himself and it is said that he had used a device in which we now call the tourniquet. (NCBI)