Congestive Heart Failure: Bring on the Leeches?

Wikimedia photo.

The April edition of Right on Prime covers everything you need to know about congestive heart failure from the definition to palliative care, including advice on therapeutic phlebotomy. No matter where you practice you will find breath-taking take home points. Take a listen or read: The Generalist: Acute and End Stage CHF in the ED by Vanessa Cardy MD, Mel Herbert MD, and Heidi James MD in the April edition of Right on Prime available to all CMES participants using either the CMES thumb drive or Pi.

Leech application tubes and blood letting tool, probably from 1800s. Photo from Wikimedia.

Who Knew? Bloodletting (or blood-letting) is the withdrawal of blood from a patient to prevent or cure illness and disease. Bloodletting, now called therapeutic phlebotomy, whether by a physician or by leeches, was based on an ancient system of medicine in which blood and other bodily fluids were regarded as “humours” that had to remain in proper balance to maintain health. It is claimed to have been the most common medical practice performed by surgeons from antiquity until the late 19th century, a span of almost 2,000 years. (article content from Wikipedia)

C3: Psychiatric Emergencies Part 2

Wikimedia image.

Last week I introduced you to C3, Continuous Core Content, the newest medical education available to all CMES and CMES-Pi participants. The March C3 content is part two of psychiatric emergencies covering depression, anxiety and eating disorders. You can access the C3 folder with the thumb drive or the smartphone apps using the CMES-Pi.

Do you know what endocrine disorder can mimic depression or that pulmonary emboli can present with a common and misleading psychiatric complaint? A quick read of the Take Home Points will lift your spirits and lessen your anxiety when faced with a psychiatric emergency.

Who Knew? Psychiatric illness were recognized over 4000 years ago In the second millennium B.C. in Mesopotamia where there are written accounts of depression. It was thought to be a spiritual condition and therefor treated by priests instead of healers.

Introducing C3: Continuous Core Content

Photo from Wikimedia.

WooHoo…C3 is here for your listening and viewing pleasure! EM:RAP has generously provided Techies Without Borders their C3 content to add to our cloud based server. This CME content is available to participants using either the thumb drive (USB) or Raspberry-Pi access options. It will be in a separate folder and you can use the Search for specific topics.

C3 is a clinical based review on how to assess and treat common and grave Emergency Department and Urgent Care complaints. It’s ideal for all practitioners wanting to review the basics efficiently and quickly. Think of it as your basic Lego set.

The same great MP3 and PDF formats are available. The audio file contains a focused summary at the end of the talk, so if you are short on time you can fast forward. The PDF files start off with the all important Take Home Points for a quick update. You can also test your knowledge with the uploaded questions and answers.

Build up or reinforce your basic knowledge with C3. Thank you EM:RAP.

Who Knew? “The Lego Group began in the workshop of Ole Kirk Christiansen (1891–1958), a carpenter from Billund, Denmark, who began making wooden toys in 1932.[7][8] In 1934, his company came to be called “Lego” derived from the Danish phrase leg godt [lɑjˀ ˈɡʌd], which means “play well”.” (Wikipedia)