Thumbs Up Nigeria

Meet Dr. Dare Ogunlusi from Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria. He is an attending in the Department of Accident and Emergency.

He is the newest recipient and participant in CMES. Techies Without Borders (TWB) was referred to Dr. Dare by his friend and colleague Dr. Lisa Charles from Victoria Hospital in St. Lucia. TWB mailed a thumb drive to Dr. Dare after discussing the cme options that would best work for him. He will be testing the thumb drive and providing feedback on usability and content for his specific location.

CME development and utilization face challenges worldwide because resources are limited and infrastructure for the delivery of healthcare and information is fragile. Feedback from locations around the globe helps us improve our services and products. If you have colleagues who would be interested in either CMES or CMES-Pi, please contact Dr. Debra Stoner at: deb.twb@gmail.com

Gastric Lavage: Yes or No?

Antique gastric pump.
(Wikimedia Commons photo)

According to an EMRAP article, orogastric lavage was considered a standard procedure. It has never been proven to be of benefit. There are no recent studies. Although it was thought that removing the gastric contents might decrease the severity of the overdose, this is probably not the case. Why? Listen to the podcast or read the bullet points of the May 2018 article called “Pumping the Stomach” No More, by Anand Swaminathan MD and Sean Nordt MD, PharmD.

Do you still lavage for poison overdose? What substances? Leave a comment and share your knowledge.

Who Knew? Unlike many of our simpler medical and surgical instruments, mention of the stomach and duodenal tubes is not to be found in the classical writings of the ancient Greek and Arabian physicians…the somewhat uncertain origin of the stomach tube may be placed at about 144 years ago. Precursors of the stomach tube, however, were in common usage as early as the days of Imperial Rome. (Annals of Internal Medicine; The History of the Invention and Development of the Stomach and Duodenal Tubes by John R. Paine, MD)

 

 

 

Leeches: Friend or Foe

Leech
(WikiMedia Commons photos)

My experience with leeches is limited to a profound fear while hiking during the Nepal monsoon season where the rainforest leeches drop from the vegetation and make you their personal smorgasbord.

Have you ever used a leech medically to reduce swelling and vascular congestion? How do you remove leeches? How do you treat the wounds? Leave a comment and share your skills with us leech-less colleagues.

Who Knew? Leeches have 32 Brains. Their internal structure is divided into 32 segments. Each of these 32 segments has its own segment of the brain. Every leech also has two reproductive organs and 9 pairs of testes.

The Long & Short of Neck Injuries

Giraffe (WikiCommons photo)

Blunt neck trauma can be an airway nightmare. Listen to the podcast or catch the bullet points about workup and treatment from the May 2018 EMRAP article by Mel Herbert MD and Billy Mallon MD called Blunt Neck Trauma.

Who Knew? A giraffe’s neck is too short to reach the ground. It spreads its front legs or kneels to reach the ground for a drink of water.