Behind the Scenes: Meet Ruxandra

Meet Ruxandra, Team CMES.

Ruxandra summed up her CMES experiences by declaring, “When it comes to CMES work, we suffer together when something goes wrong and we share the happiness when the apps are finally up and running.”

Ruxandra describes her contribution to CMES. “To summarize what I usually do for the project, I will say that I do all the tedious work both for English and Spanish versions. More specifically, I update the training materials and upload the CME content on a monthly basis.  Even though managing the database through our admin panel should not be very complicated, I never had a dull moment since I joined this project. Either the scope of the project changed, the data files type changed or other constraints occurred. I had to be flexible and work closely with our wonderful developers to address all these issues. Lastly, I tend to be the troublemaker, and this makes me to be maybe the most “hated” person in the group.  Due to the nature of my job (IT Auditor), once I start analyzing and testing the applications for errors, I always manage to identify something else that needs to be fixed. Therefore, one of my duties is to escalate these issues to our hard-working developers. After I usually ruin their weekend or their vacation, I get to verify all the bug fixes and only after that I happily return to test the application from a user perspective.”

“In conclusion, when I don’t focus on the content management, the research aspect of the project or the blog maintenance, I love to get involved with the super-technical issues the team confronts. Finally, I love spending time with the CMES team and learn from them as much as I can. This is because I have the ultimate advantage to be the youngest and nevertheless the luckiest for being surrounded by so many smart and wonderful people.”

 

 

Back to Basics: Perforated Eardrum

1800s cartoon. WikiCommons.

1800s ear trumpet. WikiCommons.

Infection is the leading cause of tympanic membrane perforation (TMP). As practitioners decrease the use of antibiotics for acute OM, the question arises…will there be an increase in TMP?

Take a few minutes to read the bullet points or listen to the March EMRAP podcast: Perforated Eardrum by Rob Orman MD and Clay Finley MD. How would you answer these questions?

  1. Can you use Cortisporin (neomycin and polymyxin B sulfates and hydrocortisone otic solution) in suspected TMP?
  2. What percent of TMP heal spontaneously?
  3. How to treat otorrhea in a patient with tympanostomy tubes?

Who Knew: At the end of the 18th century, eardrum perforation was indiscriminately performed by untrained “physicians” in England, France, and Germany. Because of the negative results of indiscriminate eardrum perforation, the operation soon acquired a bad reputation and was not performed for decades until Herrmann Schwartze reintroduced paracentesis into the daily practice of otorhinolaryngology.

 

 

Kunde Hospital, Nepal Slices Off More CMES-Pi

Kunde Hospital. Photo from WikiCommons.

Kunde Hospital staff. Photo courtesy of Dr. Kami.

Last year a CMES-Pi device was installed in the remote Khumbu Region in northeast Nepal. Dr. Mingma and Dr. Kami have been avid users. Dr. Manoj followed up this month with the Kunde Hospital team and here is what Dr. Kami had to say:
“Thank you so much again for the CMES-Pi, I can now download on my Apple iPad. Great information and it has been very useful for us at Khunde. Thank you.”
Kunde is a good example of a remote location benefiting from up-to-date cme. Situated 3800 meters above sea level, it was founded by Sir Edmund Hillary in 1966. Now funded by the Sir Edmund Hillary Foundation of Canada (SEHF) it serves 8000 local people and trekkers.
Who Knew?
Historically cme is not a new concept. From the start of institutionalized medical education practitioners used grand rounds, case discussions and meetings to discuss published papers and share knowledge. However bias was a leading concern when the pharmaceutical companies began funding cme in the 1950s.