Thumbs Up for Victoria Hospital, Castries, St. Lucia

Victoria Hospital, Castries, St. Lucia

Dr. Lisa Charles, ED Director

Welcome and meet Dr. Lisa Charles, Director of Victoria Hospital Emergency Department. Dr. Charles and her team of eight ED physicians joined the Continuing Medical Education on Stick (CMES) project this month. CMES is a collaborative initiative to improve access to cme for medical practitioners in resource-challenged areas.

Victoria Hospital is located in Castries, St. Lucia, an island in the eastern Caribbean Sea. It is the main public healthcare facility for the northern part of the island. Mr. C. Felix St. Hill, Permanent Secretary of the Department of Health and Wellness granted permission for Dr. Debra Stoner, from Techies Without Borders (TWB), to present the project to the ED staff and train them how to use the CMES thumb drives. CMES is an education project of TWB.

Dr. Charles plans to use the lectures to meet some of the St. Lucia Medical Council’s cme requirements as traveling off the island to attend cme conferences can be challenging for her staff.

Who knew? Maybe you know of colleagues in challenging clinical practices who would benefit from the CMES Project? Please put them in contact with Dr. Debra Stoner:



HEART Pathway

Valentines card (photo Wikimedia Commons)

Valentines Day is this week on February 14th. What better time to review the HEART Pathway for your patients with chest pain.

(Photo PubMed Commons)

Check out the podcast or pdf on how one community hospital incorporated it into their electronic medical record (EMR) in the February EMRAP podcast: HEART in EMR; by Rob Orman MD and Peter Smulowitz MD. Don’t use EMR at your facility…leave a comment and tell your colleagues how you would use it in your practice or at your facility.

Who knew? In 1835, 60,000 Valentine cards were sent by post in Britain, despite postage being expensive. (Wikipedia)



Push the Pause Button

(Wikimedia Commons image)

Several years ago my team and I resuscitated a two-year-old child with fulminant meningococcemia during a night shift in a small community hospital. It was only my second case in 25 years of practice, but despite providing all the right lifelines and transfer to a tertiary care facility with a pediatric ICU…I knew the child would die.

We carried on with our duties long after the helicopter departed…steadfast yet each of us enveloped in our own sadness. It wasn’t until weeks later during the “debriefing” meant to cleanse our hearts and minds of the tragedy did we dare face the death together as a team.

I can tell you from experience this is not the way to approach a death of this magnitude…or any death. Take a short listen or read about initiating “The Pause” after a death no matter where you practice by listening to: The Pause by Reuben Strayer MD on the February EMRAP cme.

Who knew? Ever wonder where those computer symbols originated? According to Gizmodo, the pause symbol is based on a musical notation, the caesura, which indicates a-wait for it-pause.